The All New TNC

About 10 years ago, I launched TNC (the Naked Convos), a safe space where anyone and everyone could come to share their thoughts about anything and everything without being judged. This was 2010 before Instagram launched and when I could count every one of us on Twitter.

It became very obvious that many of us had a lot to say. We had questions on our minds that we had no one to ask. The engagement on TNC was off the charts, random posts got an average of 100+ comments and I once put up a BLANK post that got 150+ comments – http://bit.ly/38RQ97R

We grew the TNC team to manage the rapid growth of the platform. We brought in amazing people like @Pemiaguda, @Wtalabi, @sirkastiq, @terdoh, @lagoshunter and many more, and we also started taking guests posts.

We had wild ideas and we did EVERYTHING we set out to do. We held 7 editions of our ‘one-of-a-kind’ TNC year-end events hosted by @GbemiOO and I. We adapted some of our content into a theatre production that sold-out Terra Kulture – http://bit.ly/3caVxVE  

We published two books (These Words Expose Us and Lights Out: Resurrection) – https://amzn.to/39VWMWI. We launched a podcast – http://bit.ly/3bU3TRc. We held a reality-style online writing competition – http://bit.ly/2Tafkvw

We adapted one of our written series in a YouTube WebSeries that amassed 3million+ views and got selected for screening at two festivals – http://bit.ly/2wxDkRB. But what was most important for me was the fact that we shaped culture in ways I never imagined.

TNC trended effortlessly on Twitter back then when you couldn’t game the system. Search #ShitNigerianGirlsSay or any of the TNC event hashtags on Twitter. We helped people talk about difficult topics like abortion, mental health, sex (A LOT of sex), abuse and many more.

I know for a fact that TNC inspired many writers, blogs and platforms. With the growth of Twitter and platforms like @Zikokomag, @Replublicjournal, we believe there are more outlets for us to express ourselves nowadays.

In 2018 we ended our writer monetization program and launched the beta version of the TNC Stories app, which got about 10k downloads. The beta test helped us gain more clarity and with that, we have now decided to chart a new course for TNC.

After almost 10 years, we have built up what we believe is the largest library of original stories in Africa. While some have read these stories, many haven’t. And even for those who have, we can certainly present them in more engaging formats that will make them more relatable.

And so, today, I’m proud to officially announce the re-launch of TNC as the platform for telling original African stories.

What does this mean? The TNC website as it is will remain but become focused on original short stories. Yes, no more opinion pieces :(. The site will publish a new short story every Thursday.

But what’s even more exciting is the launch of our very own YouTube Channel (TNCTV). TNCTV is an independent channel, dedicated to telling original African stories through our web series and movies.

Following the success of #OBFW, this April, we will launch our first original series titled My name Is A-Zed. This is based on an original written web series I wrote on the TNC website 9 years ago.

Ahead of the web series, today, I’m happy to announce the release of the #MyNameIsAzed story podcast directed by the amazing @iamthefayfay and starring @ilowitdflo as the voice of A-Zed.

#MyNameIsAzed is out everywhere – Soundcloud, Spotify, Apple, Facebook Watch, YouTube and IGTV. Please listen to it, share with friends and support us by following us and subscribing to our YouTube channel. Thank you to everyone who has been a part of TNC one way or the other.

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