Can religion and logic go together?

Opinion

I am firmly against the idea that religion and logic don’t go together. It is very lazy and an incredibly dangerous idea to perpetuate. It also seems like a condescending idea peddled by us atheists to seem superior to the religious but ALSO a condescending idea peddled by religious people (mostly christians tbh) to seem…

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I am firmly against the idea that religion and logic don’t go together. It is very lazy and an incredibly dangerous idea to perpetuate. It also seems like a condescending idea peddled by us atheists to seem superior to the religious but ALSO a condescending idea peddled by religious people (mostly christians tbh) to seem superior to atheists and agnostics. 

Setting aside the fact that the God of the three Abrahamic religions is portrayed as a God of order (and thus logic), arriving at that conclusion [that religion and logic don’t go together] is quite baffling but also understandable.

First off, understand that I have zero problem believing in the supernatural deeds as long as the premise of a supernatural world is established in my mind. Possibility is not a fixed area. A hundred years ago, curing malaria was impossible, 50 years ago the iPhone was impossible, today, commercial space travel is impossible. When you’re dealing with an omnipotent supernatural being, doing something like rewriting the laws of physics to transform water into wine is child’s play and a physicist might easily explain how even we might be able to do it, in theory. After all, virgin birth is (now) a possibility.

My problem with religion is the logical and moral inconsistencies and the lack of evidence to support certain claims in nearly all religions. For instance, the justified mass murder of hundreds of thousands of people in the Old Testament, the illusion of free will and so on. I do not necessarily have a problem with the concept of God, either conventional or not.

Logic and religion blend in the way mathematics and the universe blend. One can be used to explain the other. Would a God of order asks you to suspend the brain that HE gave you in order to understand him? There’s a difference between suspending your preconceived notions and suspending your brain. Faith can be seen as a form of enlightenment and even though it is the evidence of things not seen, that does not necessarily mean it is the evidence of things not known.

Faith does not tell you to accept that the creation story was literally true. Faith is built on the foundation of logic. So you believe that God will be there in your time of need. The belief is faith, the ‘knowledge’ of his intervention is logic. If you can apply your God given logic to things like the creation story and slavery, why can’t you apply it to more ‘complex’ things like abortion and homosexuality? Or do you also believe that people with tattoos will not go to heaven/paradise?

Religion is not and should not be a reason to be dense. Use your brain, if he gave it to you, it’s there for a reason. Shalom.

Disclaimer: I am a super saiyan agnostic atheist. Not even remotely religious

Responses

  1. Ufuomaee
    I like this post for a few reasons, though ultimately, I disagree with the authour. I wholly believe there is logic in faith. However, the problem with convincing Atheists is that THERE IS NO FAITH IN LOGIC. But with God, we must always exercise faith, and that involves logic. As it is written, “come, let us reason together…”

    Cheers, Ufuoma.

    1. Jamaara Post author
      Thanks Ufuoma I’m really glad you liked it. Although I also have to disagree with you on “there is no faith in logic”. There is plenty of faith in logic, there just isn’t blind faith.
    1. Jamaara Post author
      Hey Seyi. Gnosticism means to “have knowledge”. That’s why I call myself an agnostic atheist because I don’t “have the knowledge” that proves that a supreme deity doesn’t exist. Various other reasons but this is really the quickest explanation.
  2. KC
    Err…just out of curiosity…was this culled from somewhere? Cos I’ve read this same article somewhere else before now. Or maybe its the same writer?
  3. Jamaara Post author
    Thans Ufuoma. Although I have to disagree with you on “there is no faith in logic”. There is plenty of faith in logic, there just isn’t blind faith.

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